Dr. ARINA K. BONES, PhD

Department of Experiential Psychology
University of Darache
Monte Carlo, Monaco

Em: arina.bones@gmail.com

 

Current Research

Identity researchers have a strong bias for studying living people. This may be partly due to prejudiced attitudes of researchers against the dead. But, the unavailability of research tools may also contribute. Our recent work develops new methods, and we are now expanding our investigation of malleability and change in identity pre- and post-death. Also, we are interested identifying people who appear to be alive, except that implicit measures reveal that they are actually dead. You can try our tools on yourself at http://deadidentity.com/.

A related line of work attempts to root out aliens amongst us using the latest psychology technology. The Implicit Association Test can circumvent the tricks of most alien species to disguise their true identities. So far, we have successfully identified less than 10 aliens in our midst: http://humanoralien.com/.

Selected Publications and Presentations

Bones, A. K. (in press). We knew the future all along: Scientific a priori hypothesizing is much more accurate than other forms of precognition. Perspectives on Psychological Science.

Bones, A. K. (2012). We knew the future all along: a priori hypothesizing is much more accurate than other forms of precognition. Poster presented at the Annual Meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, San Diego, CA.

Bones, A. K. & Gosling, S. D. (2009). Do Social Psychologists cause priming research or does priming research cause Social Psychologists? Poster presented at the Annual Meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Tampa, FL. [Note: The 2nd author's contribution was extracted from his memory under sedation. Any protests that he did not contribute should be ignored.]

Bones, A. K. & Johnson, N. R. (2007). Measuring the immeasurable, or, "Could Abraham Lincoln Take the Implicit Association Test?" Perspectives on Psychological Science, 2, 406-411.

Johnson, N.R., & Bones, A.K. (2006, December). Mommy and I are better than daddy: A case study of infant implicit parent preference and self-esteem. Poster presented at the National Institute of Health conference of Fundable Translational Research, Washington, DC. [Winner of the Mission-relevant award.]

Bones, A. K., & Johnson, N.R. (2002). Phil Zimbardo is definitely an alien. American Psychologist, 57, 1135–1142.

Bones, A. K. (1996). Invaders need no facilitators: Merely exposing the alien "Zajonc". American Psychologist, 51, 1231–1238.